Can Nitro Cold Brew Power Rocket Ships?

 

In response to the title of this blog, I have no idea. I'll level with you. I'm not -brace yourself- a scientist. That being the case, I can't definitively say one way or the other BUT, as a human with a brain that functions as long as I'm not being asked what I did today, I'm going to go out on an empirical limb and say probably not. 

So if it's not being used to further the exploration of our ever expanding and infinitely complex universe, why's nitro cold brew so awesome? Well buckle up. Because you're about to find out. 

According to Wikipedia (which, much like coffee, is another late night companion to the desperate, cramming student, squinting through florescence-fried eyes into a glowing screen covered in words like 'ribosome' or 'Kafkaesque') nitro cold brew is the Guinness of the coffee world. It's rich, and dark, and guaranteed to make you want another. 

Also, it 'cascades.' Here's a quick list of things that cascade: waterfalls, flowy horse manes, the curtain at the end of a life changing show, balloons from the ceiling after you win something awesome, and nitro cold brew. It's in good company. When we say 'cascade' in reference to nitro though, it's less about galloping to the crest of a hill at sunrise and more about nitrogen bubbles being introduced to cold brew. This introduction creates an effect that is not only aesthetically really beautiful, but incredibly pleasing to the palate. The sweet, chocolate and nutty flavors of our dark roast Nicaraguan Santa Rita pop and the texture graduates from flat, to full and silky. 

And the process of the introduction is really involved. I know this because Mark, our resident expert and potentially the world's most patient guy, took me step by apparatus-disassembling step through exactly how it works. 

A canister of nitrogen is connected to a keg of cold brew via hose (imagine Mark wrestling both keg and canister from fridge), a lever is switched on the canister (here Mark fiddles in demonstration) and the relief valve atop the keg is pulled a time or two (Mark is not throttling an angry cat into submission, it's just oxygen being purged). It's also important to agitate, so the keg should be shaken, or turned upside down. 

Finally, the cold brew is drawn through a very specific spout designed to suppress the gas, and a small, metal restrictor disc breaks the nitrogen out of the coffee to create that signature cascade of nitro cold brew. What ends up in the cup is delicious, dense, dark, and frothy. Like something a little sweeter? Try our organic coconut version.

Ice and milk are always options, but when you come in we'll definitely recommend you try it as deliciously is. 

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